What’s New With Equine Cribbing Research?

Scientists are working to get to the root of equine cribbing as they explore brain anatomy, genetics, potential causes, health consequences, welfare, treatment, and more. With each decade they’re learning more about the whens, whys, and hows of this and other stereotypies in horses, humans, and other animals. Here’s what they’ve learned in their most…

Five Questions to Determine Horse Happiness

Historically, there has been emphasis on the absence of indicators of unhappiness or distress, with a focus on assuming that if the horse is not showing distress or displeasure, he must be happy. Now, there is increasing interest in looking for signs of happiness in horses.

Need Horse Help? New Advice Library Has You Covered

International charity World Horse Welfare has launched a new “one-stop shop” for horse advice and information. A range of horse health and management topics are covered in the new Advice Library, including well-being essentials, covering basic welfare fundamentals such as the 3Fs (friends, forage and freedom), and the 5 domains of animal welfare – which…

THE SCIENCE OF HORSE RACING: UNDERSTANDING THE EQUINE MIND

In the world of animal intelligence, few possess the fascinating intellect of the horse. Their ancient partnership with humans and intricate social dynamics within herds have intrigued scientists and equestrians alike with their seemingly profound understanding and emotional depth. Years of experiments and training have shown us that horses possess an intelligence greater than we…

Stable Vices: Are They The Horse’s Problem Or Ours?

For many decades, horses have developed habits that frustrate the people managing them. From cribbing to stall weaving to pawing, owners have swapped explanations, old wives’ tales, and supposed remedies for these behaviors, which are often lumped together in a category called “stable vices.” Dr. Katherine Houpt, professor emeritus in behavior medicine at the Cornell…

Using Technology to Better Teach Riding

Learning to ride horses takes time and is steeped in traditional methods of teaching. Instructors often stick to these traditional approaches because they are seen to be the main way students learn. However, these methods are not effective for all participants, and those with challenges in learning often struggle to understand and build their skills.…

Why do Horses Chew Wood?

Horses chew wood for a variety of reasons, but it’s most commonly a behavioural response born out of boredom or a coping mechanism to deal with stress. Research shows that wood chewing correlates strongly with the amount of time a horse is stabled and the amount of long-stem forage available. When horses are stabled or…

THE SCIENCE OF HORSE RACING: IT’S ALL ABOUT TIME

Of all of the data we collect for assessing a horse’s performance, time remains among the best metrics for measuring how well they ran at a particular racetrack at a specified distance on a given day. The methods for timing races have evolved with the sport, but like other sporting pursuits with a multitude of…